About the Book

A truly significant discovery, Walt Whitman's Manly Health and Training is an entertaining health manifesto that sheds new light on one of America's major nineteenth-century authors. In the fall of 1858, a thirteen-part essay series appeared in the New York Atlas, under the title Manly Health and Training. This nearly 47,000-word journalistic effort, written by Walt Whitman under his pen name "Mose Velsor," was lost for more than 150 years, buried in just a handful of library archives, until its recent unexpected discovery. What you hold in your hands is a long-lost health manifesto that, remarkably, is as relevant today as it was back in the nineteenth century. A truly illuminating discovery that reveals much about a little-known period in Whitman's life, this men's guide features earnest recommendations for eating, sleeping, and exercise, emphasizing moderation and focusing on the holistic relationship between the mind and the body: - Be a carnivore: "Let the main part of the diet be meat, to the exclusion of all else.



About the Author

Walt Whitman

Walt Whitman was born on May 31, 1819, near Huntington, Long Island, New York. On July 4, 1855, the first edition of Leaves of Grass, the volume of poems that for the next four decades would become his lifes work, was placed on sale. Although some critics treated the volume as a joke and others were outraged by its unprecedented mixture of mysticism and earthiness, the book attracted the attention of some of the finest literary intelligences. His poetry slowly achieved a wide readership in America and in England, where he was praised by Swinburne and Tennyson. (D. H. Lawrence later referred to Whitman as the"greatest modern poet, and"the greatest of Americans. Whitman suffered a stroke in 1873 and was forced to retire to Camden, New Jersey, where he would spend the last twenty years of his life. There he continued to write poetry, and in 1881 the seventh edition of Leaves of Grass was published to generally favorable reviews. However, the book was soon banned in Boston on the grounds that it was obscene literature. In January 1892 the final edition of Leaves of Grass appeared on sale, and Whitman's life work was complete. He died two months later on the evening of March 26, 1892, and was buried four days afterward at Harleigh Cemetery in Camden.



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