About this item

A remarkable new historical thriller by New York Times notable mystery author Lawrence Goldstone that evokes the New York City of 1899.

In 1899, in Brooklyn, New York, Dr. Noah Whitestone is called urgently to his wealthy neighbor's house to treat a five-year-old boy with a shocking set of symptoms. When the child dies suddenly later that night, Noah is accused by the boy's regular physician -- the powerful and politically connected Dr. Arnold Frias -- of prescribing a lethal dose of laudanum.

To prove his innocence, Noah must investigate the murder -- for it must be murder -- and confront the man whom he is convinced is the real killer. His investigation leads him to a reporter for a muckraking magazine and a beautiful radical editor who are convinced that a secret, experimental drug from Germany has caused the death of at least five local children, and possibly many more. By degrees, Noah is drawn into a dangerous world of drugs, criminals, and politics, which threatens not just his career but also his life.

As he did in his first highly successful medical thriller The Anatomy of Deception, Goldstone weaves a savvy tale of intrigue and stunning twists that incorporates real-life historical figures and events into the action while richly recreating the closing days of the nineteenth century -- a time when American might was on the march in the Pacific, medicine was poised to leap into a new era, radical politics threatened the status quo in American and Europe, and the role of women in American society was undergoing profound change.



About the Author

Lawrence Goldstone

Lawrence Goldstone is the author of more than a dozen books of both fiction and non-fiction. Six of those books were co-authored with his wife, Nancy, but they now write separately to save what is left of their dishes.
Goldstone's articles, reviews, and opinion pieces have appeared in, among other publications, the Wall Street Journal, Boston Globe, Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune, Miami Herald, Hartford Courant, and Berkshire Eagle. He has also written for a number of magazines that have gone bust, although he denies any cause and effect.
His first novel, Rights, won a New American Writing Award but he now cringes at its awkward prose. (Anatomy of Deception, The Astronomer, and Murtro's Niche are much better.)
Despite a seemingly incurable tendency to say what's on his mind (thus mortifying Nancy) , Goldstone has been widely interviewed on both radio and television, with appearances on, among others, Diane Rehm (NPR) , "Fresh Air" (NPR) , "To the Best of Our Knowledge" (NPR) , "The Faith Middleton Show" (NPR) , "Tavis Smiley" (PBS) , and Leonard Lopate (WNYC) . His work has also been profiled in The New York Times, The Toronto Star, numerous regional newspapers, Salon, and Slate.
Goldstone holds a PhD in American Constitutional Studies from the New School. His friends thus call him DrG, although he can barely touch the rim. (Sigh. Can't make a layup anymore either.) He and his beloved bride founded and ran an innovative series of parent-child book groups, which they documented in Deconstructing Penguins. He has also been a teacher, lecturer, senior member of a Wall Street trading firm, taxi driver, actor, quiz show contestant, and policy analyst at the Hudson Institute.
He is a unerring stock picker. Everything he buys instantly goes down.
For those with insatiable curiosity, you can learn more at www.lawrencegoldstone.com



Read Next Recommendation

Discuss with your friends


Report incorrect product information.