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"How would you like to hang out with Yogi Berra and Ron Guidry during spring training? Funny and sweet, Driving Mr. Yogi transports you there." - Jim Bouton, author of Ball Four

It happens every spring. Yankees pitching great Ron Guidry arrives at the Tampa airport to pick up Hall of Fame catcher and national treasure Yogi Berra. Guidry drives him to the ballpark. They watch the young players. They talk shop. They eat dinner together and tease each other mercilessly. They trade stories about the greats they have met along the way. And the next day they do the same thing all over again.

As every former ballplayer can appreciate, in that routine, every spring, there emerges a certain magic.

Driving Mr. Yogi is the story of how a unique friendship between a pitcher and catcher is renewed every year. It began in 1999, when Berra was reunited with the Yankees after a long self-exile, the result of being unceremoniously fired by George Steinbrenner fourteen years before. A reconciliation between Berra and the Boss meant that Berra would attend spring training again. Guidry befriended "Mr. Yogi" instantly. After all, Berra had been a mentor in the clubhouse back when Guidry was pitching for the Yankees. Guidry knew the young players would benefit greatly from Mr. Yogi's encyclopedic knowledge of the game, just as Guidry had during his playing days. So he encouraged him to share his insights. Soon, an offhand batting tip from Mr. Yogi turned Nick Swisher's season around. Stories about handling a hitter like Ted Williams or catching Don Larsen's perfect game captured their imaginations. And in Yogi, Guidry found not just an elder companion or source of amusement - he found a best friend.
At turns tender, at turns laugh-out-loud funny, and teeming with unforgettable baseball yarns that span more than fifty years, Driving Mr. Yogi is a universal story about the importance of wisdom being passed from one generation to the next, as well as a reminder that time is what we make of it and compassion never gets old.



About the Author

Harvey Araton

Harvey Araton is a journalist, author and adjunct college professor based in Montclair, N.J. He worked for four daily newspapers in the New York City area, including the Staten Island Advance, New York Post, Daily News and New York Times, where he served as a Sports of the Times columnist for 15 years, 25 overall and still contributes on a freelance basis. He has covered all sports and some non-sports, with a specialty in basketball. In 2017, he was the recipient of the Curt Gowdy Award at the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, MA., given annually to print/digital and broadcasting members of the media. He has covered 10 Olympics, many Wimbledon the U.S. Open tennis tournaments, the French Open and the Davis Cup in Spain and Zimbabwe. He has also covered many N.B.A. finals, World Series, Super Bowls and men's and women's Final Fours in college basketball.From August 2009 to May 2010, Mr. Araton served as a reporter for the features group at The Times, where he wrote for Sunday Real Estate, Styles, Home and Dining. He has also written for the Times Magazine, Book Review and Culture sections.In addition to "Our Last Season: A Sportswriter, A Fan, A Friendship," Araton is the author, co-author and editor of eight other books, including "Driving Mr. Yogi," about the poignant relationship between Yogi Berra and Ron Guidry--a New York Times bestseller--and "When the Garden Was Eden," on the Knicks' championship teams of the early 1970s. The book was adapted for an ESPN 30 for 30 documentary, which Araton co-produced. His first novel, "Cold Type," was published in 2014.He was nominated by The Times for a Pulitzer Prize in 1994; was named 1998 Sportswriter of the Year by the National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association; won first place in 1994 for Best News Story from the Associated Press Sports Editors; won first place in 2005 for Column Writing from the New York State Associated Press Association; and was honored in 1997 and 2007 for Column Writing by the Associated Press Sports Editors. In 1986, he received the Feature Writing Award from the Associated Press Sports Editors.He also teaches media and writing courses at Montclair State University.Born in New York City on May 17, 1952, Mr. Araton earned a B.A. in English from the City University of New York in 1975.



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