About this item

The Year of the Pitcher is the story of the remarkable 1968 baseball season, which culminated in one of the greatest World Series contests ever, with the Detroit Tigers coming back from a 3-1 deficit to beat the Cardinals in Game Seven of the World Series.

In 1968, two remarkable pitchers would dominate the game as well as the broadsheets. One was black, the other white. Bob Gibson, together with the St. Louis Cardinals, embodied an entire generation's hope for integration at a heated moment in American history. Denny McLain, his adversary, was a crass self-promoter who eschewed the team charter and his Detroit Tigers teammates to zip cross-country in his own plane. For one season, the nation watched as these two men and their teams swept their respective league championships to meet at the World Series. Gibson set a major league record that year with a 1.12 ERA. McLain won more than 30 games in 1968, a feat not achieved since 1934 and untouched since. Together, the two have come to stand as iconic symbols, giving the fans "The Year of the Pitcher" and changing the game. Evoking a nostalgic season and its incredible characters, this is the story of one of the great rivalries in sports and an indelible portrait of the national pastime during a turbulent year - and the two men who electrified fans from all walks of life.



About the Author

Sridhar Pappu

Sridhar Pappu is the author of The Year of the Pitcher: Bob Gibson, Denny McLain and the end of Baseball's Golden Age and for Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, October 2017.

Sridhar currently writes "The Male Animal" column for The New York Times. He's interested in and writes about all kinds of things, including national politics, media, and sports. He began his career as a feature writer for the Chicago Reader and has served as a columnist at The New York Observer and as a correspondent for The Atlantic Monthly. In addition he worked as a staff writer at Sports Illustrated and The Washington Post. His work has appeared in numerous publications including New York Magazine, Fast Company, Mother Jones and Men's Journal.

A native of Oxford, Ohio, and graduate of Northwestern University, he currently lives in Brooklyn.



Read Next Recommendation

Discuss with your friends


Report incorrect product information.