About this item

The beloved New York Times bestselling author of the modern classic Frindle celebrates books and the joy of reading with a new school story to love!

Sixth grader Alec can't put a good book down.

So when Principal Vance lays down the law - pay attention in class, or else - Alec takes action. He can't lose all his reading time, so he starts a club. A club he intends to be the only member of. After all, reading isn't a team sport, and no one would want to join something called the Losers Club, right? But as more and more kids find their way to Alec's club - including his ex-friend turned bully and the girl Alec is maybe starting to like - Alec notices something. Real life might be messier than his favorite books, but it's just as interesting.

With The Losers Club, Andrew Clements brings us a new school story that's a love letter to books and to reading and that reminds us that sometimes the best stories are the ones that happen off the page - our own!

Praise for The Losers Club!
* "Clements's latest is engaging and funny. A laugh-out-loud first purchase for all middle grade collections, and a solid read-aloud choice for classrooms." - School Library Journal, Starred Review

"Clements is out to celebrate reading in all its obsessiveness, and...tosses in shout-outs to a passel of other writers. [The Losers Club] gives fried bookworms everywhere the satisfaction of knowing that friends may desert them (if only temporarily) but books never will. " - The New York Times

Praise for Andrew Clements!
"Clements is a genius." - The New York Times

"We have never read an Andrew Clements book that we haven't loved." - The Washington Post



About the Author

Andrew Clements

I was born in Camden, New Jersey in 1949 and lived in Oaklyn and Cherry Hill until the middle of sixth grade. Then we moved to Springfield, Illinois. My parents were avid readers and they gave that love of books and reading to me and to all my brothers and sisters. I didn't think about being a writer at all back then, but I did love to read. I'm certain there's a link between reading good books and becoming a writer. I don't know a single writer who wasn't a reader first. Before moving to Illinois, and even afterwards, our family spent summers at a cabin on a lake in Maine. There was no TV there, no phone, no doorbell - and email wasn't even invented. All day there was time to swim and fish and mess around outside, and every night, there was time to read. I know those quiet summers helped me begin to think like a writer. During my senior year at Springfield High School my English teacher handed back a poem I'd written. Two things were amazing about that paper. First, I'd gotten an A - a rare event in this teacher's class. And she'd also written in large, scrawly red writing, "Andrew - this poem is so funny. This should be published!" That praise sent me off to Northwestern University feeling like I was a pretty good writer, and occasionally professors there also encouraged me and complimented the essays I was required to write as a literature major. But I didn't write much on my own - just some poetry now and then. I learned to play guitar and began writing songs, but again, only when I felt like it. Writing felt like hard work - something that's still true today.After the songwriting came my first job in publishing. I worked for a small publisher who specialized in how-to books, the kind of books that have photos with informative captions below each one. The book in which my name first appeared in print is called A Country Christmas Treasury. I'd built a number of the projects featured in the book, and I was listed as one of the "craftspeople"on the acknowlegements page, in tiny, tiny type.In 1990 I began trying to write a story about a boy who makes up a new word. That book eventually became my first novel, Frindle, published in 1996, and you can read the whole story of how it developed on another web site, frindle.com. Frindle became popular, more popular than any of my books before or since - at least so far. And it had the eventual effect of turning me into a full-time writer. I've learned that I need time and a quiet place to think and write. These days, I spend a lot of my time sitting in a small shed about seventy feet from my back door at our home in Massachusetts. There's a woodstove in there for the cold winters, and an air conditioner for the hot summers. There's a desk and chair, and I carry a laptop computer back and forth. But there's no TV, no phone, no doorbell, no email. And the woodstove and the pine board walls make the place



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