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A New York Times Notable BookOne of the Best Books of the Year: San Francisco Chronicle, Seattle TimesCambridge student Serena Frome's beauty and intelligence make her the ideal recruit for M15. The year is 1972. The Cold War is far from over. England's legendary intelligence agency is determined to manipulate the cultural conversation by funding writers whose politics align with those of the government. The operation is code named "Sweet Tooth." Serena, a compulsive reader of novels, is the perfect candidate to infiltrate the literary circle of a promising young writer named Tom Haley. At first, she loves the stories. Then she begins to love the man. How long can she conceal her undercover life? To answer that question, Serena must abandon the first rule of espionage: trust no one.



About the Author

Ian McEwan

Ian McEwan was born on 21 June 1948 in Aldershot, England. He studied at the University of Sussex, where he received a BA degree in English Literature in 1970. He received his MA degree in English Literature at the University of East Anglia. McEwan's works have earned him worldwide critical acclaim. He won the Somerset Maugham Award in 1976 for his first collection of short stories ; the Whitbread Novel Award (1987) and the Prix Fémina Etranger (1993) for ; and Germany's Shakespeare Prize in 1999. He has been shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize for Fiction numerous times, winning the award for in 1998. His novel received the WH Smith Literary Award (2002) , National Book Critics' Circle Fiction Award (2003) , Los Angeles Times Prize for Fiction (2003) , and the Santiago Prize for the European Novel (2004) . He was awarded a CBE in 2000. In 2006, he won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for his novel and his novel was named Galaxy Book of the Year at the 2008 British Book Awards where McEwan was also named Reader's Digest Author of the Year. McEwan lives in London. His most recently published work is



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