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 Baseball is much more than the national pastime. It has become an emblem of America itself. From its initial popularity in the mid-nineteenth century, the game has reflected national values and beliefs and promoted what it means to be an American. Stories abound that illustrate baseball's significance in eradicating racial barriers, bringing neighborhoods together, building civic pride, and creating on the field of play an instructive civics lesson for immigrants on the national character. In A People's History of Baseball, Mitchell Nathanson probes the less well-known but no less meaningful other side of baseball: episodes not involving equality, patriotism, heroism, and virtuous capitalism, but power--how it is obtained, and how it perpetuates itself.



About the Author

Mitchell Nathanson

Mitch Nathanson, Professor of Law and professor in the Jeffrey S. Moorad Center for the Study of Sports Law at the Villanova University School of Law, focuses in his scholarship on the intersection of sports, law and society. He has written numerous articles examining the interplay between, most notably, baseball and American culture. His article, "The Irrelevance of Baseball's Antitrust Exemption: A Historical Review," won the 2006 McFarland-SABR Award which is presented in recognition of the best historical or biographical baseball articles of the year. His 2008 book, "The Fall of the 1977 Phillies: How a Baseball Team's Collapse Sank a City's Spirit," is a social history of 20th century Philadelphia as told through the relationship between the city and its baseball teams - the Athletics and the Phillies. In 2009 he was the co-producer and writer of "Base Ball: The Philadelphia Game," a documentary "webisode" on the 19th century development of the game within the city that is part of a larger documentary project, "Philadelphia: The Great Experiment," currently in production and to which he is a contributing scholar. In addition, he was a scholarly advisor to the 2011 HBO production, "The Curious Case of Curt Flood." In the United States, he has lectured at, among other venues, the National Baseball Hall of Fame, and since 2011 has been a Guest Professor in the International Sports Law Program at the Instituto Superior de Derecho y Economia in Madrid, Spain. In 2012 he authored "A People's History of Baseball," which challenged many of the myths embedded within America's national pastime and offered a fresh perspective on what the term "baseball as America" means. He is also co-author of "Understanding Baseball: A Textbook." His article "Who Exempted Baseball, Anyway: The Curious Development of the Antitrust Exemption that Never Was," was published in the Winter, 2013 edition of the Harvard Journal of Sports and Entertainment Law and won the 2013 McFarland-SABR Award. His current book, "God Almighty Hisself: The Life and Legacy of Dick Allen," was published by the University of Pennsylvania Press in the spring of 2016.



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