About this item

We know that stress is bad for us. We see evidence of this in the news, we hear it from our doctors, and we feel it at the end of a hectic week. Health professionals have learned that stress interferes with our lives-it increases missed work days, can lead to relationship difficulties, and can increase the risk of turning to drugs and alcohol. It has also been shown that in some cases, chronic stress can increase our risk of developing certain serious illnesses. We know of all these negative effects that stress can cause, but, realistically, for most of us there's no end in sight-stressful events will crop up throughout our lives and even daily.We can't stop stressful events from happening, but we can change our lifestyles to better handle stressful situations.



About the Author

David H. Barlow

David H. Barlow received his Ph.D. from the University of Vermont in 1969 and has published over 400 articles and chapters and over 20 books. His major interests over the past 30 years has been the study of anxiety and its disorders, and developing new psychological procedures for practice settings. Prior to his current position as Professor and Director of the Center for Anxiety and Related Disorders and Director of Clinical Psychology Programs at Boston University, he founded clinical psychology internships at Brown University and the University of Mississippi Medical Center. He is the recipient of the 2000 American Psychological Association (APA) Distinguished Scientific Award for the Applications of Psychology. Other awards include the Career Contribution Awards from the Massachusetts and California Psychological Associations, and a MERIT award from the National Institute of Mental Health for long-term contributions to the clinical research effort. During the 1997/1998 academic year, he was Fritz Redlich Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in Behavioral Sciences in Palo Alto, California. He is Past-President of the Society of Clinical Psychology of the American Psychological Association, and the Association for the Advancement of Behavior Therapy. He was also Chair of the American Psychological Association Task Force of Psychological Intervention Guidelines, a member of the DSM-IV Task Force of the American Psychiatric Association, and was Co-Chair of the Work Group for revising the anxiety disorders categories.



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