About this item

Two of the most beloved novels in all of English literature--together in one extraordinary volume.

A TALE OF TWO CITIES
After 18 years as a political prisoner in the Bastille, the aging Doctor Manette is finally released and reunited with his daughter in England. There the lives of the two very different men, Charles Darnay, an exiled French aristocrat, and Sydney Carton, a disreputable but brilliant English lawyer, become enmeshed through their love for Lucie Manette. From the tranquil roads of London, they are drawn against their will to the vengeful, bloodstained streets of Paris at the height of the Reign of Terror, and they soon fall under the lethal shadow of the guillotine.

GREAT EXPECTATIONS
A terrifying encounter with an escaped convict in a graveyard on the wild Kent marshes; a summons to meet the bitter, decaying Miss Havisham and her beautiful, cold-hearted ward Estella; the sudden generosity of a mysterious benefactor--these form a series of events that changes the orphaned Pip's life forever, and he eagerly abandons his humble origins to begin a new life as a gentleman. Dickens's haunting late novel depicts Pip's education and development through adversity as he discovers the true nature of his "great expectations."

This deluxe paperback edition features
* French flaps
* rough-cut high-quality paper
* complimentary front- and back-cover designs highlighting each novel and including foil and debossing

A Charles Dickens Timeline

1812 Born February 7 in Portsmouth, England 1824 His father John sent to Marshalsea Debtor's Prison for a debt of £40 and 10 shillings
Began working 10-hour days in shoe-polish warehouse to help support family 1833 First story, "A Dinner at Poplar Walk," appeared in the Monthly Magazine 1836 First book, Sketches by Boz, collected his early journalism and stories
First novel, The Pickwick Papers, began its monthly serialization
Married Catherine Hogarth 1837-39 Oliver Twist appeared in monthly installments 1838-39 Nicholas Nickleby serialized 1840-41 The Old Curiosity Shop 1841 Barnaby Rudge 1842 American Notes, based on his tour that year of the United States 1843 The Christmas Carol, the first of his "Christmas tales" 1843-44 Martin Chuzzlewit 1846-48 Dombey and Son 1849-50 David Copperfield 1852-53 Bleak House 1854 Hard Times 1855-57 Little Dorrit 1857 Met actress Ellen Ternan, his longtime companion 1858 Separated from his wife, Catherine 1859 A Tale of Two Cities 1860-61 Great Expectations 1864-65 Our Mutual Friend 1867-68 Second tour of America 1868-69 Farewell reading tour of the British Isles 1870 The Mystery of Edwin Drood (unfinished)
Died from a stroke on June 9



About the Author

Charles Dickens

Charles John Huffam Dickens (7 February 1812 - 9 June 1870) was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world's best-known fictional characters and is regarded as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era. His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime, and by the twentieth century critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories enjoy lasting popularity. Born in Portsmouth, Dickens left school to work in a factory when his father was incarcerated in a debtors' prison. Despite his lack of formal education, he edited a weekly journal for 20 years, wrote 15 novels, five novellas, hundreds of short stories and non-fiction articles, lectured and performed extensively, was an indefatigable letter writer, and campaigned vigorously for children's rights, education, and other social reforms. Dickens was regarded as the literary colossus of his age. His 1843 novella, A Christmas Carol, remains popular and continues to inspire adaptations in every artistic genre. Oliver Twist and Great Expectations are also frequently adapted, and, like many of his novels, evoke images of early Victorian London. His 1859 novel, A Tale of Two Cities, set in London and Paris, is his best-known work of historical fiction. Dickens's creative genius has been praised by fellow writers - from Leo Tolstoy to George Orwell and G. K. Chesterton - for its realism, comedy, prose style, unique characterisations, and social criticism. On the other hand, Oscar Wilde, Henry James, and Virginia Woolf complained of a lack of psychological depth, loose writing, and a vein of saccharine sentimentalism. The term Dickensian is used to describe something that is reminiscent of Dickens and his writings, such as poor social conditions or comically repulsive characters. On 8 June 1870, Dickens suffered another stroke at his home after a full day's work on Edwin Drood. He never regained consciousness, and the next day, five years to the day after the Staplehurst rail crash, he died at Gad's Hill Place. Contrary to his wish to be buried at Rochester Cathedral "in an inexpensive, unostentatious, and strictly private manner," he was laid to rest in the Poets' Corner of Westminster Abbey. A printed epitaph circulated at the time of the funeral reads: "To the Memory of Charles Dickens (England's most popular author) who died at his residence, Higham, near Rochester, Kent, 9 June 1870, aged 58 years. He was a sympathiser with the poor, the suffering, and the oppressed; and by his death, one of England's greatest writers is lost to the world." His last words were: "On the ground", in response to his sister-in-law Georgina's request that he lie down.(from Wikipedia)



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