About this item

From the New York Times bestselling author of How to Be a Woman and Moranthology comes a collection of Caitlin Moran's award-winning London Times columns that takes a clever, hilarious look at celebrities, society, and the wacky world we live in today - including three major new pieces exclusive to this book.

When Caitlin Moran sat down to choose her favorite pieces for her new book, she realized that they all shared a common theme - the same old problems and the same old ass-hats. Then she thought of the word 'Moranifesto', and she knew what she had to do ...

Introducing every piece and weaving her writing together into a brilliant, seamless narrative - just as she did in Moranthology - Caitlin combines the best of her recent columns with lots of new writing unique to this book as she offers a characteristically fun and witty look at the news, celebrity culture, and society. Featuring strong and important pieces on poverty, the media, and class, Moranifesto also focuses on how socially engaged we've become as a society.

And of course, Caitlin is never afraid to address the big issues, such as Benedict Cumberbatch and duffel coats. Who else but Caitlin Moran - a true modern Renaissance woman - could deal with topics as pressing and diverse as the beauty of musicals, affordable housing, Daft Punk, and why the Internet is like a drunken toddler?

Covering everything from Hillary Clinton to UTIs, Caitlin's manifesto is an engaging and mischievous rallying call for our times.



About the Author

Caitlin Moran

Caitlin Moran had literally no friends in 1990, and so had plenty of time to write her first novel, The Chronicles of Narmo, at the age of fifteen. At sixteen she joined music weekly, Melody Maker, and at eighteen hosted the pop show Naked City. Following this precocious start she then put in eighteen solid years as a columnist on the Times - both as a television critic and also in the most-read part of the paper, the satirical celebrity column "Celebrity Watch" - winning the British Press Awards' Columnist of The Year award in 2010 and Critic and Interviewer of the Year in 2011. The eldest of eight children, Caitlin read lots of books about feminism - mainly in an attempt to be able to prove to her brother, Eddie, that she was scientifically better than him. Caitlin isn't really her name. She was christened 'Catherine.' But she saw 'Caitlin' in a Jilly Cooper novel when she was thirteen and thought it looked exciting. That's why she pronounces it incorrectly: 'Catlin.' It causes trouble for everyone.



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